• Tag Archives autism
  • Hospital for Special Care Launches “Spectrum of Kindness” to Foster a Better Understanding of Autism and the Faces Behind the Numbers

    In light of the recent report released by the CDC yesterday announcing new Autism prevalence rates and the increasing number of children being diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Hospital for Special Care is increasing its Autism awareness efforts and focusing on the faces behind the numbers of those diagnosed.

    To support Autism Awareness Month nationally, Hospital for Special Care has created an online community and resource to help promote a better understanding of caring for children with Autism ASD.

    The goal of the initiative is to gather and share positive, real-world accounts of the everyday hurdles and joys associated with Autism that will inspire others to be more informed, tolerant and giving of themselves to help make it easier for those living with ASD.

    Through Spectrum of Kindness, individuals can share their stories of kindness and inspire others by uploading a story, video or photos — whether it’s an act of kindness in a potentially stressful public setting, a teacher that has gone that extra mile or a family that has been helped by an extraordinary caregiver.

    Visit www.Spectrumofkindness.org for more information, share your stories and be inspired.

    About Hospital for Special Care
    Hospital for Special Care (HSC) is one of the five largest, free-standing long-term acute care hospitals in the United States and the nation’s only long-term acute-care hospital serving adults and children. HSC is recognized for advanced care and rehabilitation in pulmonary care, acquired brain injury, medically-complex pediatrics, neuromuscular disorders (including ALS research), spinal cord injury, comprehensive heart failure as well as diagnostic, assessment and consulting services for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders.

    Located in New Britain and Hartford, CT, HSC operates inpatient and outpatient facilities serving Southern New England on a not-for-profit basis. For the latest news and information, please visit www.hfsc.org, and follow us on Twitter @HospSpecialCare.

    Logo – http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140328/NY93117LOGO

    SOURCE Hospital for Special Care

    CONTACT: Jordana Carideo, Mason, Inc., 203.393.1101 x166, Jcarideo@mason23.com


  • CDC estimates 1 in 68 children in multiple communities in the U.S identified with autism spectrum disorder

    The statistics recently released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) about the increase in the prevalence rate of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in U.S children (one in 68) are startling to some and disturbing to all of us touched by autism. Within hours of the release, conflicting opinions on the veracity and accuracy of, and meaning behind, these statistics were voiced. Regardless of interpretations, the call to action is clear: 1) renewed emphasis on early diagnosis across all communities, ethnicities, and socio-economic groups; 2) access to treatment at the earliest possible age 3); getting information into the hands of families and caregivers about the most effective treatment options; and 4) increased research to help identify effective treatments for adults with ASD. We must redouble our efforts to educate families and practitioners about autism’s early warning signs and diagnose children at a younger age. The earlier a child is diagnosed, the better the long-term outcome. Studies show that early diagnosis and intervention during the first years of a child’s life can significantly impact his or her long-term prognosis, particularly in the areas of language and social behavior. We must also make information universally available about the most effective evidence-based interventions and create easier, faster, and more affordable access to treatment for every child and family that needs it. But there is more. The National Autism Center (NAC) is preparing to release the results of its latest study. One of its key findings reveals the alarming lack of scientific studies focused on treatments for adults on the autism spectrum. As the groundswell of children with ASD continues to expand, we face an overwhelming number of individuals with autism moving into and through adulthood. Adults with ASD often face daunting challenges as they grapple with transitioning into adulthood, finding appropriate housing and services, securing meaningful work opportunities, and building a life integrated into the broader community. These latest findings by the NAC shed light on another serious barrier – a lack of meaningful research of evidence-based interventions for adults. As if the existing rates of ASD in this country weren’t alarming enough, this new CDC information is a clarion call to expand our efforts as a nation. And these efforts must also include more funding to conduct critical research in order to offer real and meaningful guidance regarding best practices for adults. Each of these things can and does literally impact lifetime outcomes for too many of us. We must do more. SOURCE May Institute CONTACT: Julia Burgess, Senior Director, Corporate Communications, 781.437.1348, jburgess@mayinstitute.org